Friday, April 12, 2024
HomeAerospace TechnologySPACECRAFT RUNNING EXPERT QD DRIVE

SPACECRAFT RUNNING EXPERT QD DRIVE

- Advertisement -

LOST CONTACT WITH SPACECRAFT RUNNING EXPERT QD DRIVE

Amount of Comfort

According to The Debrief, a test of the quantum drive, a contentious propellantless propulsion technology, failed when the satellite it was installed on became quiet.

Rogue Space Systems stated in a news statement that continuous power-system problems beset its Barry 1 cubesat, which was sent into orbit by a SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket.

The purpose of the test with the IVO Limited-developed quantum drive was to see if the engine could change the satellite’s orbit. But for some reason, the test was never started after the satellite had been in orbit for more than two months. As a result, communication with the satellite was lost on February 9, bringing an abrupt stop to a demonstration that was meant to defy accepted scientific theories.

 

Unthinkable Engine

- Advertisement -

Many skeptic experts thought the quantum drive would be ineffective if the test had ever been carried out. This is because the engine is a “reactionless drive,” which means that thrust is produced without the usage of a reaction mass, or more specifically, the propellant.

Such a contraption would not function according to Newtonian physics, as propulsion is impossible without a propellant. However, Forbes pointed out that IVO said that their quantum drive could provide an astounding 52 millinewtons of force for every watt of power, which is an absurd twelve times more efficient than current ion motors utilized on satellites.

It’s a very nice concept. Propane has the drawback of exhausting quickly. Its weight also contributes significantly to the overall weight of a spacecraft, which increases launch costs in addition to its design constraints.

Thus, there has been a great deal of enthusiasm and debate around lab studies that suggest spaceships may eliminate fuel by utilizing the unsettling aspects of quantum physics. However, none of these have proven successful in large-scale experiments thus far, much less ones carried out in space (where, The Debrief claims, IVO’s test would have been the first).

One More Break

Despite the setback and the seeming inevitability of physics, Mansell stated that IVO will continue to test its quantum engine in orbit.

He informed The Debrief, “The overall configuration of the Drives will not change.” “We have been working nonstop to enhance the Drives as we wait for the Barry-1 testing.The next space set will have these improvements.”

It must be admitted: after waiting for months in orbit, it seems a little fortuitous that the cubesat failed before the quantum motors could even be turned on. However, who knows? Perhaps the next time they’ll remember to switch it on and, with any luck, even succeed in defying the laws of physics.

- Advertisement -
RELATED ARTICLES

LEAVE A REPLY

Please enter your comment!
Please enter your name here

Most Popular